Agricultural Reform Route Map

Date published: 22 June, 2023

We will transform how we support farming and food production in Scotland to become a global leader in sustainable and regenerative agriculture.

We will establish a robust and coherent framework to underpin Scotland's future agriculture support regime from 2025 onwards, that delivers high quality food production, climate mitigation and adaptation, and nature restoration. High quality, nutritious food locally and sustainably produced is key to our wellbeing – in economic, environmental, social and health terms. We will support and work with farmers and crofters to meet more of our own food needs sustainably and to farm and croft with nature.

The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring that tenant farmers, smallholders, crofters, new entrants and land managers are given equality of opportunity to allow them to play a key role in making our Vision for Agriculture a reality.

We continue to work closely with the agriculture industry, most notably through the Agriculture Reform Implementation Oversight Board (ARIOB) and other industry stakeholder groups, in order to meet our shared objectives, and to build on the excellent work completed by the successful Farmer-Led Groups (FLGs) initiative.

This second edition of the Agricultural Reform Route Map sets out what changes recipients of current farm payments will be expected to make from 2025 and beyond. It also sets out the process for changing to a new agricultural support framework from 2026. It includes information on important dates, the measures being considered now, when current schemes will transition or end, the support available, and how to prepare for these first changes from 2025. The changes are gradual – I promised no cliff edges, and there will be none. While direct payments will continue, some of the changes mean doing more in return for that support.

We will also now embark on a significant engagement programme to reach as many people as possible, as early as possible to start getting ready for change. There will be a series of information leaflets and we will be working with key stakeholder bodies like NFU Scotland, the Scottish Tenant Farmers’ Association, the Scottish Beef Association, QMS and the Scottish Crofting Federation to get information to as many farmers and crofters as possible. We will be visiting agricultural shows this summer and auction marts this autumn with a special roadshow. And information will be available on the Scottish Government web pages.

The Route Map will be updated regularly to provide the most up-to-date information possible. As things change, I will ensure that farmers and crofters are informed as early as possible.

Mairi Gougeon

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Islands

Wider land management and change plan for Scotland

Scotland is changing the way it manages land, to help the natural environment to flourish, and combat climate change. Farmers and crofters have an important role to play in that process. This image shows how things will change for agriculture, land use, environment and forestry in Scotland and everyone working in these sectors.

the wider land and agriculture change plan for Scotland 2023-2032

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In the future at least half of all funding for farming and crofting will be targeted towards outcomes for biodiversity gain and climate mitigation and adaption. This is to improve the resilience, efficiency and profitability of the sector. This chapter outlines the proposed agricultural support framework from 2025 onwards. As more detail becomes available, it will be updated to help farmers and crofters prepare for change.

Agriculture Support Package 2025 tiers 1-4

Download image as a pdf

The future model will support farmers, crofters and land managers to achieve the following four outcomes:

  • The food production sector is a productive and sustainable part of the economy helping Scotland's people live and work sustainably on our land.
  • The transition to Net Zero supports the rural economy and supports efforts to reduce rural poverty and inequality, targeting support to those who need it most.
  • Reduced Greenhouse Gas emissions from the agricultural sector.
  • A substantial regeneration of biodiversity, ecosystem and soil health.

The text below, explains a bit more about the four tiers:

Tier 1: ‘Base Level Direct Payment’ - a universal, entry-level payment for undertaking agricultural activity while meeting minimum essential standards in relation to sustainable farming activities, protecting the environment, animal health and welfare and ensuring Fair Work. These standards will help to make businesses more efficient. Existing cross-compliance conditions will be maintained as a minimum in the new support framework and will apply across all tiers but may be delivered differently.

Tier 2: ‘Enhanced Level Direct Payment’ - a universally accessible payment that supplements Base. This is for applicants delivering Base requirements and undertaking further activity that delivers outcomes for nature and climate improvement, including recognition of wider land management.

Find out more about what is being proposed for inclusion in the Guidance on the List of Measures.

Tier 3: ‘Elective Payment’ - a competitive or non-universal (criteria dependent) range of payments for targeted actions and undertakings on particular habitats, and for defined species, to deliver nature and climate outcomes included in the Vision for Agriculture.

Tier 4: ‘Complementary Support’ - provision of support for Continuing Professional Development (CPD), advice, knowledge exchange and linkages to wider land management support from Scottish Government officials and/or public partners.

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The existing framework of support will continue in 2023 and 2024 to provide security and stability to farmers and crofters.

Changes to existing schemes will begin in 2025, with a phased approach to bringing in the new support framework from 2026. This chapter sets out what that means for the current schemes, when they will change and what can be done now to prepare.

What's new from 2025

  • the maintenance of existing cross compliance requirements as a minimum on future support;
  • the introduction of new protections for Peatlands and Wetlands as a new condition on basic payments;
  • the foundations of a Whole Farm Plan, including soil testing, animal health and welfare declaration, carbon audits, biodiversity audits and supported business planning;
  • the introduction of new conditions to the Scottish Suckler Beef Support Scheme linked to calving intervals to encourage livestock keepers to reduce the emissions intensity of their cattle production systems.

The Scottish Government will work with farmers and crofters on what these will mean in practice and how farmers and crofters will be expected to implement them. The image below illustrates what will happen to existing schemes through to 2026.

an overview of which schemes will change across 2025 and 2026 into the ARP

See the information below for more detail by scheme.

Preparing for Sustainable Farming

From 2025, new conditions will start to be introduced to; help businesses start to lower their emissions, introduce different ways of farming which are more low carbon, and increase the efficiency of farming activity. The work we are doing now to help farmers and crofters to prepare for these changes now is called Preparing for Sustainable Farming (PSF).

PSF support includes:

  • Financial support for farmers and crofters (arable land & improved grassland) to claim support towards the cost of soil analysis;
  • £500 towards having a Carbon Audit performed for farming businesses if they do not have one already, or where the current Carbon Audit is more than 3 years old;
  • Up to a maximum of £1,250 over two years to deliver a list of animal health and welfare measures;
  • Access to herd data for cattle keepers through MyHerdStats to provide consistent and accurate insight into herd performance

This PSF support is transitional – it is aimed at helping farmers and crofters make a Just Transition and prepare for the new future support framework. We expect the PSF support to end by March 2025 and from then, soil testing, animal health and welfare declarations and carbon audits will be part of the productivity baseline for a Whole Farm Plan.

Basic Payment Scheme and Greening

The current region model will remain in place during this phase and while we provide PSF support. However, it will be reviewed to ensure that Tier 1 Base is fit for purpose by 2027. We will not make changes to the Region model without consulting widely on any new proposals first.

New conditions will be introduced to the Basic Payment Scheme in 2025, making this support conditional on meeting essential standards in farming activity; climate response; biodiversity gain; whilst safeguarding animal health and welfare standards and workers’ rights. These standards will also help to make businesses more efficient.

In 2026 the Basic Payment Scheme will end and ‘Base Support’ and ‘Enhanced support’ will be introduced.

By 2027 the region model will have been reviewed and any changes made will be to support the transition to a more economic and environmentally-sustainable model for the industry.

Greening

Greening requirements will not change in 2025, to ensure continuity in the environmental and climate change benefits currently being delivered by the management of Ecological Focus Areas (EFA).

From 2026, the requirements of Greening may be delivered differently, and consideration is being given to how existing EFA might be built upon to support space for nature in the new framework.

Cross Compliance

Existing cross compliance conditions will be maintained as a minimum in the new support framework and will apply across all tiers. The conditions are being reviewed to identify ways to make them more impactful in the delivery of future policy outcomes.

Protection of wetlands and peatlands will be a feature of Scotland's future support framework and the Scottish Government will work with farmers and crofters on how we implement the principles of the EU Good Agricultural and Environmental Condition standards (GAEC) for peatlands and wetlands as a new condition under Cross Compliance from 2025.

Whole-Farm Plans

Whole Farm Plans (WFPs) were a recommendation of the Farmer-led Groups. Whole Farm Plans will be introduced as a tool to help farmers and crofters integrate food, climate and biodiversity outcomes on their holdings and inform where they can seek support from the future support framework. The intention of the Whole Farm Plan is to help businesses become more environmentally and economically resilient and sustainable.

The foundations of the Whole Farm Plan will go live in 2025. The Foundations are 'producitvity baselines': soil testing, animal health and welfare declaration, carbon audits, biodiversity audits, and the support for effective business planning.

We are committed to delivering a Just Transition and the WFP will be developed with this at the forefront. That is why we will continue to work with the industry to deliver a 'just' sequencing of this requirement, ensuring that those able to contribute the most will drive this change, whilst support is put in place for those who need it. There will be no cliff edges in relation to the current support.

We are committed to designing the WFP model so that it works for farmers, crofters and land managers. To meet this clear commitment we have formed an industry-led steering group to help develop the WFP which will meet every month.

We are determined to support the industry through this transition and the WFP is a key aspect of this.

Voluntary Coupled Support

Scottish Suckler Beef Support Scheme (SSBSS)

New conditions will be introduced to SSBSS in 2025, linked to calving interval performance, which aims to encourage beef farmers to undertake steps that will help to reduce the emissions' intensity of their cattle production systems and make them more financially efficient.

The free-to-use MyHerdStats tool allows farmers and crofters to view performance indicators for their herds, allowing them to identify opportunities for improvements to herd efficiency, including calving intervals.

Calving interval is a key efficiency metric for beef production systems and 'longer calving intervals equate to longer periods during which a cow is incurring maintenance costs (e.g. feed, veterinary care) but also emitting greenhouse gases without contributing to actual beef production.' The mean calving interval of suckler beef in Scotland is currently c.400 days, and 12% of animals have a calving interval of 430 days or more. (Information taken from Calving Intervals in Scotland's Cattle Population report)

The Scottish Government will work with the beef sector on the detailed proposals and how they will be implemented. The scheme is expected to continue in 2026 but may be delivered differently. Consideration is still being given to how Voluntary Coupled Support will be delivered from 2027.

Scottish Upland Sheep Support Scheme (SUSSS)

SUSSS is expected to continue in 2025 and 2026 but may be delivered using a different model from the current one.

Consideration is still being given to how Voluntary Coupled Support will be delivered from 2027.

Less Favoured Area Support Scheme (LFASS)

This scheme is expected to continue to 2026, however, we are working with stakeholders to consider how best to deliver this type of support under the new framework. Changes may be introduced from 2025 to support the transition towards a more economically and environmentally sustainable model for the farmers and crofters who need this sort of support the most. Consideration is still being given to how this type of support will be delivered from 2027.

Agri Environment and Climate Scheme (AECS)

This scheme is expected to continue to 2026 to deliver elements of Tiers 3 and 4 until new Elective and Complementary Support is implemented from 2027. Some the options currently available through AECS are being considered for inclusion in Tier 2 so that more people can implement them. Changes may be made to the scoring, budgets or options to support a Just Transition towards a more economically and environmentally sustainable model for the sector.

Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS)

This Scheme is expected to evolve and continue to deliver elements of Tier 3 and 4 until new support is implemenented from 2027. Some of the options available under this scheme are being considered for inclusion as eligible measures/activities in Tier 2 so that more people can implement them. Changes may be made to the scoring, budgets or options to support a Just Transition towards a more economically and environmentally sustainable model for the sector.

Targeted Capital Support - Agricultural Transformation Fund, Crofting Agricultural Grant Scheme, Knowledge Transfer and Innovation Fund (KTIF), and Food Processing, Marketing and Cooperation (FPMC)

These schemes will continue until 2026 and will deliver Tier 3 and 4 of the Future Support Framework until new Elective and Complimentary Support is implemented from 2027. We may make changes to the scoring, budgets or options available under these schemes so that they support the transition towards a more economic and sustainable model for the sector.

Farm Advisory Service

The Farm Advisory Service will continue to deliver information and resources aimed at increasing the profitability and sutainability of farms and crofts. It will deliver elements of Tier 4 of the Future Support Framework until new Complementary Support mechanisms are introduced.

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In 2025, new conditions will be introduced:

  • the maintenance of existing cross compliance requirements as a minimum on future support;
  • the introduction of new protections for Peatlands and Wetlands as a new condition of basic payments;
  • the foundations of a Whole Farm Plan, including soil testing, animal health and welfare declaration, carbon audits, biodiversity audits and supported business planning;
  • the introduction of new conditions to the Scottish Suckler Beef Support Scheme linked to calving intervals to encourage livestock keepers to reduce the emissions intensity of their cattle production systems.

Support will be conditional on meeting essential standards in farming activity; climate response; biodiversity gain; whilst safeguarding animal health and welfare standards and workers' rights. These standards will also help to make businesses more efficient.

Farmers and crofters will also be asked to undertake specific actions that support their businesses to be more efficient and improve their resilience while doing their part in meeting the climate and biodiversity targets. Future support is intended to allow businesses to draw support from across all four tiers to support them in a long term shift to sustainable and regenerative agriculture.

Regenerative agriculture is a collection of farming practices. These focus on renewing and conserving soils, landscapes and ecosystems. Supporting nature and social justice in rural communities alongside agricultural outputs. It draws upon decades of scientific and applied research on agriculture and ecology. Key practices include minimising soil disturbace, and maximising crop diversity. Another approach is to integrate livestock and arable farming more closely.

The goals of regenerative agriculture include:

  • Improving animal welfare
  • Increasing climate-resilience of production
  • Capturing carbon in soils and vegetation
  • Enhancing water quality and supply in the landscape
  • Supporting thriving biodiversity and ecosystem health

Regenerative agriculture recognises that each farm has different soils, climate, managers, and history. For that reason, there is no definitive list of methods or actions. Instead, farmers and crofters decide the best approaches to achieve desired outcomes. Their choices need to be supported by practical training to select and use these methods effectively.

In February 2023, Scottish Government released a list of the measures being considered and appraisals for inclusion for future agriculture support in Scotland. This document, called Agriculture Reform List of Measures contains information on the broad types of actions government will expect from farmers and crofters who wish to receive agricultural support payments in future. It is not a final list of measures but it is designed to be indicative and to help the agriculture sector to plan for future changes.

The Scottish Government is yet to establish how these and other measures will be applied within the future framework of support. This includes evaluation on where they are best positioned within the four tiers (base, enhanced elective and complementary).

The Scottish Government recognise that these measures are broad and have a greater emphasis on certain sectors. Work is ongoing to ensure that all sectors of Scotland’s rural economy will have the opportunity to increase their contribution towards nature and climate targets. There will be a wider range of measures that may be supported, and this work continues to develop. High level illustrative examples can be found in Annex A.

More detailed information on the conditions for support and guidance will be published over the next two years and key dates are set out in the When will I get more information to help me plan? section.

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Preparing for Sustainable Farming (PSF)

Preparing for Sustainable Farming (PSF) is already helping businesses prepare for these changes with support for conducting carbon audits and soil sampling, support for animal health and welfare activities and access to herd data for Suckler beef producers through MyHerdStats.

Carbon audits and soil sampling

The first part of the programme, launched in 2022, is designed to help businesses understand carbon emissions and sequestration; and potentially lower emissions and increase sequestration and efficiencies. This is done through carbon audits and soil sampling and analysis.

Businesses can claim a standard cost of £500 for an eligible Carbon Audit that will:

  • enable a business to understand their energy use and costs;
  • identify ways to use resources more efficiently;
  • understand their carbon footprint;
  • highlight areas to focus on carbon emission reductions and opportunities to sequestrate carbon.

Businesses can claim actual costs of up to £600 per 100 Ha of Region 1 land for Soil Sampling that will:

  • measure the nutrient content of the soil;
  • identify nutrient deficiencies;
  • reduce unnecessary maintenance practices and fertiliser applications;
  • target application for crop production;
  • build a Nutrient Management Plan;
  • save time and money.

A standard £250 Development Payment can also be paid with the first Soil Sampling claim to allow farmers and crofters to spend time on things that will widen their understanding of Nutrient Management Planning and the associated activities. For example:

  • researching best practice for soil sampling and nutrient management;
  • referring to technical notes;
  • taking professional advice;
  • attending monitor farm updates;
  • attend meetings regarding soil structure, nutrient usage and green manures.

Support for animal health and welfare

Support is now available to directly support farmers to deliver a list of animal health and welfare measures. Eligible businesses can claim standard costs up to a maximum of £1,250 over two years.

MyHerdStats

Information is also available to cattle keepers through MyHerdStats. This is a an online tool that securely presents herd management information within the ScotEID system, utilising existing login details. It provides cattle keepers with a consistent and accurate insight into their herd performance to help highlight opportunities to improve business and environmental benefits. Cattle keepers can gain access to a selection of herd performance indicators and trends on metrics including:

  • percentage of cows retained;
  • number of calves registered;
  • number of cows calved;
  • values of cow and heifer efficiency;
  • cow and calf mortalities;
  • sale date profile for breeding and youngstock.

Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS)

The Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS) promotes land management practices which protect and enhance Scotland’s biodiversity, improve water quality, manage flood risk and mitigate and adapt to climate change.

The 2023 Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS) application round ran from 30 January to 7 June 2023 with funding available for slurry stores, organic conversion and maintenance and agri-environment options.

Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS)

Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use.

As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment.

The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) supports:

  • the creation of new woodlands – contributing towards the Scottish Government target of 18,000 hectares of new woodlands per year from 2024/25
  • the sustainable management of existing woodlands

Peatland ACTION

Peatland ACTION supports on-the-ground peatland restoration activities and is open for applications from eligible land managers who have peatlands that would benefit from restoration. There are no geographical restriction or target areas for Peatland ACTION funding.

Nature Restoration Fund

The Nature Restoration Fund (NRF) is a competitive fund launched in July 2021, which specifically aims to attract applicants with projects that restore wildlife and habitats on land and sea, and address the twin crises of biodiversity loss and climate change.

Farm Advisory Service (FAS)

Scotland's Farm Advisory Service (FAS) is funded by the Scottish Government, providing information and resources aimed at increasing the profitability and sustainability of farms and crofts.

Grant support, a full programme of events, a subscription service for crofts and small farms, and a range of articles and publications form the core of this service which is designed to provide integrated advice for farmers and crofters across Scotland.

Farming for a Better Climate

Farming for a Better Climate is run by Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) on behalf of the Scottish Government. It combines ideas trialled by volunteer Climate Change Focus Farms and information from scientific research. It offers practical advice to help businesses choose the most relevant measures to improve both farm performance and resilience to future climate change effects.

This includes the Integrating Trees on Your Land Network which covers the benefits that trees can bring to farming businesses. This network will host events for all farmers and crofters across Scotland and bring them together, along with experts, to share their practical knowledge, experiences and advice about the processes, objectives, challenges and outcomes of planting trees.

Monitor Farm Scotland

The Monitor Farm Scotland initiative is managed by Quality Meat Scotland and AHDB Cereals and Oilseeds with funding from the Scottish Government, aiming to help improve the productivity, profitability and sustainability of Scottish farm businesses.

The aim of the programme is to establish a group of farms to serve as monitor farms to help improve the profitability, productivity and sustainability of producers through practical demonstrations, the sharing of best practice and the discussion of up-to-date issues.

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Getting your help in the design of new services is a central principle of Scottish Government policy development and delivery.

This means:

  • providing multiple opportunities to participate;
  • using inclusive and accessible research and design methods;
  • designing the framework around the people who will use it;
  • making sure everyone can use the service;
  • reviewing and improving the service frequently.

From September 2023 volunteers can register their interest to participate in research that will help shape future changes to ensure they work for all those affected. Opportunities will include interviews, surveys, online and in-person workshops, testing and trials. Volunteers will be reimbursed for participating with the amount depending on the time and input required. Anyone can register interest using this link:

Register you interest form

The questionnaire asks for information including name, contact details, BRN number (if you have one) and preferences for the type of activity you would like to participate in. Filling in the form is simply a registration of interest and does not commit you to taking part in any of the research activities that are offered.

The first tranche of research will run to December 2023 and will focus on changes coming into effect from 2025. Information about further topics and activities will be shared with those who have registered in the coming months.

By registering your interest, you can be part of Scottish Government’s continuing work with the agricultural sector to help shape future support and how it is delivered.

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The existing framework of support will continue in 2023 and 2024 to provide security and stability to farmers and crofters.

Get ready for 2025

Agricultural support in Scotland is changing. From 2025, new conditions will start to be introduced to agricultural payments, to help farmer and crofters to start lowering their emissions, introduce different ways of farming which are more low carbon and increase the efficiency of farming activity.

New conditions to protect Peatlands will be introduced to Cross Compliance, ‘productivity baselines’: soil testing, animal health and welfare declaration, carbon audits, biodiversity audits, and the support for effective business planning will be introduced to form the foundations of a Whole Farm Plan and new conditions, linked to calving interval performance, will be introduced to the Scottish Suckler Beef Support Scheme.

More information about the actions farmers and crofters will need to take in 2026 will be announced in June 2024.

This route map will be updated as more information becomes available and if things change we will let farmers and crofters know clearly and quickly.

Supporting you where you are

Officials representing the programme will be visiting agricultural shows, marts and area offices across Scotland, to share information and answer questions about agricultural reform in Scotland.

Find us at:

Royal Highland Show 22-25 June Thainstone cattle 1 September
Haddington Show 1 July Stornoway 5 September
Sutherland Show 22 July Orkney Mart 11 September
Border Union 28-29 July Shetland Mart 22 September
Turiff Show 30-31 July Portree 2 October
Black Isle Show 2 & 3 August Craig Wilson Ayr 3 October
Keith Show 5 & 6 August Wallet Marts, Castle Douglas 7 October
Lanark Auction Mart 11 August Oban (Highland Cow sale) 9 October
Mid Argyll 12 August Oban Market 10 October
Caithness sheep sale 14 August Lanark Market 19/20 October
Lairg sheep sale 15 August Stirling UA 23 October
Dingwall market 31 August Craig Wilson Ayr 14 November

Additional dates, locations and online events to be confirmed and will be added to the programme.

See socials and Rural Payments and Services for updates.

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The diagram below is designed to help farmers and crofters plan for future changes to the agricultural support framework. It outlines key dates when further information and guidance will be available from 2023 until the end of 2025.

A timeline of when information will be available over the next 3 years

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To find out more on how to prepare for changes in 2025, you can download our information leaflets below.

The following examples provide an indication of the type of activities you might be asked to do in the future. They are illustrative only and will be subject to change as more information becomes available. For the detailed description of actions that go with these measures please refer to the Guidance on the List of Measures being considered for inclusion for future agriculture support in Scotland document.

Illustrative example A - arable

Must meet “essential standards” like Greening, Cross Compliance requirements (Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs) and Statutory Management Requirements (SMRs)) and possibly complete a Whole Farm Plan.

To access further support you may be asked to undertake specific actions aimed at addressing climate mitigation and nature restoration actions. For example you may be asked to choose from actions like:

(a) In Field Cultivated Soils

  • Continuous soil cover (package)
    • Winter cover (measure)
    • Minimum / no tillage (measure)
  • Efficient / Reduced use of synthetic inputs (package)
    • Efficient / Reduced use of inorganic fertilisers and lime (measure)
    • Efficient / Reduced use of synthetic pesticides (measure)
    • Use of N fixing crops (measure)
  • Crop diversity - arable (package)
    • Diversify crop rotation and break crop rotation period (measure)

(b) In Field Margin and Uncultivated Features

  • Retain and Enhance Field Margins and Permanent Habitat Margins (package)
    • Arable and Silage/Hay Crop Margins (measure)
    • Retain and Enhance In Field Biodiversity Cropping and Features (measure)
    • Enhance existing hedgerows (measure)

You may also be eligible for funding for targeted actions to support specific species or habitats, encourage innovation and provide supply chain support.

There will be opportunities to access the development and advice required to meet the new requirements and undertake new activities.

Illustrative example B - mixed arable and livestock

Must meet “essential standards” like Greening, Cross Compliance requirements (Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs) and Statutory Management Requirements (SMRs)) and possibly complete a Whole Farm Plan.

To access further support you may be asked to undertake specific actions aimed at addressing climate mitigation and nature restoration actions. For example you may be asked to choose from actions like:

(a) In Field Cultivated Soils

  • Continuous soil cover (package)
    • Winter cover (measure)
    • Minimum / no tillage (measure)
  • Efficient / Reduced use of synthetic inputs (package)
    • Efficient / Reduced use of inorganic fertilisers and lime (measure)
    • Efficient / Reduced use of synthetic pesticides (measure)
    • Use of N fixing crops (measure)
  • Crop diversity - arable (package)
    • Diversify crop rotation and break crop rotation period (measure)
  • Crop diversity – grassland (package)

    • Diverse sward species content (legumes-herb-grass mixtures) and use of herbal leys (measure)
    • Regenerative grazing (mob, strip, adaptive multi-paddock grazing) on permanent improved grassland (measure)
    • Bird friendly Crop Operations (measure)

(b) Uncultivated Permanent Habitats

  • Restore and Manage Existing Nature Rich Habitats (package)
    • Manage grazed habitats (measure)
    • Summer hill cattle grazing (measure)

(c) Livestock

  • Improving beef cattle nutrition (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising improved beef cattle nutrition (measure)
  • Improving beef cattle breeding (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising genetic improvement of beef cattle (measure)
  • Improving beef cattle health (package)
    • Support maintaining and improving beef cattle health (measure)
  • Methane reduction (package)
    • Supporting appropriate uptake of feed products which reduce enteric methane emissions in beef cattle (measure)
  • Nutrient management (package)
    • Efficient nutrient management (measure)

You may also be eligible for funding for targeted actions to support specific species or habitats, encourage innovation and provide supply chain support.

There will be opportunities to access the development and advice required to meet the new requirements and undertake new activities

Illustrative example C - livestock

Must meet “essential standards” like Greening, Cross Compliance requirements (Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs) and Statutory Management Requirements (SMRs)) and possibly complete a Whole Farm Plan.

To access further support you may be asked to undertake specific actions aimed at addressing climate mitigation and nature restoration actions. For example you may be asked to choose from actions like:

(a) In Field Cultivated Soils

  • Efficient / Reduced use of synthetic inputs (package)
    • Efficient / Reduced use of inorganic fertilisers and lime (measure)
  • Crop diversity – grassland (package)
    • Diverse sward species content (legumes-herb-grass mixtures) and use of herbal leys (measure)
    • Regenerative grazing (mob, strip, adaptive multi-paddock grazing) on permanent improved grassland (measure)
  • Continuous soil cover (package)
    • Minimum / no tillage (measure)

(b) Uncultivated Permanent Habitats

  • Restore and Manage Existing Nature Rich Habitats (package)
    • Manage grazed habitats (measure)
    • Summer hill cattle grazing (measure)

(c) Livestock

  • Improving beef cattle nutrition (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising improved beef cattle nutrition (measure)
  • Improving beef cattle breeding (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising genetic improvement of beef cattle (measure)
  • Improving beef cattle health (package)
    • Support maintaining and improving beef cattle health (measure)
  • Improving sheep nutrition (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising improved sheep nutrition (measure)
  • Improving sheep breeding (package)
    • Supporting and incentivising genetic improvement of sheep (measure)
  • Improving sheep health (package)
    • Support maintaining and improving sheep health (measure)
  • Methane reduction (package)
    • Supporting appropriate uptake of feed products which reduce enteric methane emissions in beef cattle (measure)
    • Supporting appropriate uptake of feed products with reduce enteric methane emissions in sheep (measure)
  • Nutrient management (package)
    • Efficient nutrient management (measure)

You may also be eligible for funding for targeted actions to support specific species or habitats, encourage innovation and provide supply chain support.

There will be opportunities to access the development and advice required to meet the new requirements and undertake new activities.

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Section Change
Whole document This version of the route map has been updated to make it a shorter and more practical document, written more plainly.
Updated diagrams to make them clearer.
More information about what will be expected in 2025 has been added and the Agriculture Bill Consultation report has been published.
When will I get more information to help me plan? Added new information to the diagram.

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